F&H

Enquire
Floral & Hardy
t:   | t: 0207 965 7578

Sensory Gardens

(If not necessarily sensible!)

To many, a garden is just a glorified bouquet, somewhere to apply an artistic touch and allownature to do the leg work and, while the aesthetic appeal of this idea is undeniable, to trulyappreciate all that a garden has to offer to the senses, we cannot be resigned to be mere voyeurs.A garden can be so much more, and here is a guide to creating spaces that encompass and cater   to all of our senses.

Sight

Nothing lifts the spirits like a well-planted garden and starting with the most obvious stimuli a garden can offer, it is important to note the psychological effect of particular hues. As we know, artistic flare alone does not make a great gardener, it also helps to have a basic interest in the natural sciences and, in this case, physics. 

image of red flowering plants

Red, for example, has longest wave length in the light/colour spectrum and as such appears closer than it really is, hence the reputation it has acquired as a bold and attention grabbing colour. Yellow and oranges can be cheerful colours too that are just as stimulating and exciting.  Green, by contrast, could perhaps provide quite a bland palette in a garden, despite the fact that at an instinctive level it is also the most comforting as it holds connotations of water.

image of blue, mauve and white flowering plants

Along with blues, whites and mauves, it can also have the effect of receding in the garden and making borders feel further away than they actually are. These soft colours can also be more effective in shady conditions or in the evening, standing out in the dim light more effectively than their deeper coloured relatives.

Sound

image of black bamboo

The most common sounds of a garden are the simplest – particularly that of the wind through the trees and nearby animals and birds, but it is possible to enhance these sounds with diligence paid to your planting. You could, for example, plant stands of bamboo and wait for the breeze to rustle through them, and you can fill the garden with plants specifically to attract birds and insects. Water features are also excellent for attracting birds and their mating songs, aside from providing their own soundtrack to calm the mind and psychologically cool the air.

Touch

There are a myriad of different textures and surfaces that one can implement in a garden toenhance the tactile experience of it. Let’s start with a major component of most gardens, thelawn – nothing quite beats the feel of cool, soft grass between your toes. Then there are the other surfaces – smooth, sawn paving, warm decking and tactile sandstone spheres, for example.

image of Lamb's Ears

In terms of planting, the exciting textures of foliage and flowers are almost endless, from the soft, felted leaves of  Lamb’s Ears (Stachys byzantina),

image of Pennisetum setaceum

to the squirrel-tailed flowering stems of Pennisetum setaceum

image of the bark of the ornamental cherry tree

and the  smooth, shiny, mahogany-coloured bark of the ornamental cherry, Prunus serrula. They all beg to be touched, caressed and enjoyed.

There’s fun to be had too – who can forget playing with Snapdragons (Antirrhinums) when they were a child?

Smell

image of honeysuckle

There’s no end to the recommendations we could make where the sense of smell is concerned, anything from lavender and honeysuckle, to roses would provide a palpable feast for your nose. But look beyond flowers and appreciate the fragrance of foliage too – of course herbs are obvious choices, but some ornamental shrubs and trees also have aromatic foliage. The aroma of Nepeta, for example, can drive your cat wild with excitement, hence its common name – Catmint. For us, there are lemon-scented geranium leaves, the fresh smell of pine and the pungent fragrance of Choisya ternata (Mexican Orange Blossom), among many others. For best effect, try to plant your scented specimens close to entrances and pathways, where you can more easily appreciate their fragrance as you pass by.

Taste

To achieve a truly delectable, edible garden your best bet would be the addition of a mini-orchard, vegetable patch or herb garden, and nothing beats home-grown produce. However, if this is an impractical measure for you, or if yours is a purely flower-based garden, you can still grow edible plants.

 Introduce easily grown Nasturtiums to your plot, as these make for an excellent, colourful and peppery salad garnish during blooming season. A patch of Daylilies (Hemerocallis) wouldn’t go amiss either as these vivid blooms have a sweet, nutty flavour (and have earned a reputation in Chinese cuisine as excellent flavouring for soups!) Climbing plants can also provide floral interest as well as an edible bounty. 

image of Passiflora caerulea fruit

Try Passion Flower (Passiflora caerulea), for example. It has exotic-looking purple and white flowers and these are followed by orange, egg-shaped fruits, which, while the bright red pulp is not perhaps as flavoursome as the variety you’d buy in the supermarket, is still stunning over ice-cream or in Champagne!

By Josh Ellison

Copyright Floral & Hardy 2015. All rights reserved. Company No. 07900342. Website managed by Assertive Media

40 Bloomsbury Way , Lower Ground Floor, London, WC1A 2SE